Dallas County Reports 1,020 New Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases and 45 Deaths, Including 189 Probable Cases

The City of Duncanville is within Dallas County and Dallas County Health and Human Services is the lead agency in charge of gathering and reporting this information. For more info and updates visit this Duncanville COVID-19 page.


As of 2:00 pm February 11, 2021, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 1,020 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) in Dallas County, 831 confirmed cases, and 189 probable cases. There is a cumulative total of 238,774 confirmed cases (PCR test). There is a cumulative total of 33,042 probable cases (antigen test). A total of 2,564 Dallas County residents have lost their lives due to COVID-19 illness.

Today's COVID-19 Risk Level is Red. Stay Home. Stay Safe.

The COVID-19 Risk Level has been elevated to Red.

Dallas County Health and Human Services is providing initial vaccinations to those most at risk of exposure to COVID-19 and 43,281 first doses of COVID-19 vaccine have been administered at the Fair Park mega-vaccine clinic, which started operations on Monday, January 11. The remainder of this week’s allocations will be for second doses.

The additional deaths being reported today include the following:

  • A man in his 30’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. He expired at home and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 40’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 50’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Mesquite. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He expired in hospice and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Grand Prairie. She expired in hospice and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Grand Prairie. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Lancaster. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Rowlett. She expired in hospice and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Farmers Branch. He expired at home.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Duncanville. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.

  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Mesquite. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in 70’s who was a resident of the City of Lancaster. He expired in hospice and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Carrollton. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Lancaster. She expired at home and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Lancaster. She had been hospitalized in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Irving. She had been critically ill in an area hospital.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Wilmer. He expired at home and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Mesquite. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Richardson. He expired in hospice and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He expired in hospice and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. He expired in the facility and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions
  •  A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Desoto. He expired in a facility.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She expired in the facility and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. He expired in the facility.
  • A man in his 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.

Four cases of the SARS-CoV-2 variant B.1.1.7 have been identified in residents of Dallas County who did not have recent travel outside of the US. The provisional seven-day average of daily new confirmed and probable cases (by date of test collection) for CDC week 4 was 1,381, which is a rate of 52.4 daily new cases per 100,000 residents. The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 remains high, with 24.7% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals testing positive in week 4 (week ending 1/30/21).

During the past 30 days, there were 7,012 COVID-19 cases in school-aged children and staff reported from 713 separate K-12 schools in Dallas County. A total of 420 children in Dallas County under 18 years of age have been hospitalized since the beginning of the pandemic, including 32 patients diagnosed with Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in children (MIS-C). Over 80% of reported MIS-C cases in Dallas have occurred in children who are Hispanic or Latino or Black.

There are currently 103 active long-term care facility outbreaks. A cumulative total of 4,044 residents and 2,263 healthcare workers in long-term facilities in Dallas have been diagnosed with COVID-19. Of these, 876 have been hospitalized and 513 have died. About 22% of all deaths reported to date have been associated with long-term care facilities. Sixteen outbreaks of COVID-19 in congregate-living facilities (e.g. homeless shelters, group homes, and halfway homes) have been reported in the past 30 days. A cumulative total of 383 residents and 191 staff members in congregate-living facilities in Dallas have been diagnosed with COVID-19.

Of all confirmed cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with more detailed summary reports updated Tuesday and Friday evenings are available at https://www.dallascounty.org/departments/dchhs/2019- novel-coronavirus/daily-updates.php.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators as part of determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. There were 750 COVID-19 patients in acute care in Dallas County for the period ending on Wednesday, February 10. The number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County was 460 for the same time period, which represents around 18 percent of all emergency department visits in the county according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. Updated modeling from UTSW shows hospitalizations between 420-720 by February 19. While we are encouraged by these decreases, COVID hospitalizations are still having a substantial impact on our health care systems. With increasing concern from the variants as well as ongoing high community spread from the original strain, now is not the time to let up. Please continue masking, distancing, and other protective measures, these remain critically important even if you have received COVID-19 vaccination. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

On December 3, Trauma Service Area E (TSA E), which includes Dallas County and the greater Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex, reached seven consecutive days where the percentage of COVID-19 confirmed patients in regional hospitals, as a percentage of available hospital beds, exceeded 15 percent. According to Governor Abbott’s Executive Order GA-32 (GA-32), this makes TSA E an area with high hospitalizations and certain occupancy reductions are automatically triggered by reaching this threshold.

“Today we announce 45 additional deaths and 1,020 new COVID-19 cases. Although our case numbers are declining, our deaths will continue to be high for some time due to the extremely high number of cases that we experienced in the preceding months and weeks.

“The decisions we make today will determine what our COVID case numbers are in two weeks and what our death numbers are in the in the weeks that follow. This is why we must continue to make good choices and follow doctors’ advice and the science. The facts are now clear: masks protect from the spread of COVID-19 as does avoiding exposure to people outside your home. Brighter days are ahead, but we must maintain our vigilance in the fight against COVID-19 to keep ourselves, our community, and our country as strong as possible until the vaccine can help us to reach herd immunity.

“Our vaccine distribution this week has been hampered by logistical delays and now the weather. Please know that if you are seeking your second dose, we will get you that second dose as soon as possible. Please stay tuned to social media and the bottom scroll of your television for updates on when our vaccine operations will run during these the upcoming ice and snow storms. We will not be able to run vaccine operations if it is not safe for our patients to travel to the vaccine site but will run vaccine operation when the weather permits. I’m sorry for the problems and anxiety these delays are causing but know that our employees and our volunteers are committed to getting you your shot just as soon as possible,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.




All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found HERE and all guidance documents can be found HERE.

Specific Guidance for the Public:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact outside your home: Put 6 feet of distance between yourself and people who don’t live in your household.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others and continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands often and with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-base hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces daily using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve, not your hands. Immediately wash your hands.
  • Monitor your health daily. Be alert for symptoms. Take your temperature and follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/